alzheimer's care

Tag Archive for caregiver burnout

Caregiver Tips for the Holidays

caregiving for the holidaysThe holiday season is typically thought of as a time of merriment, festivities, and visiting with family and friends. For older adults, however, the holidays can present some very unique challenges. For example, crowded family gatherings might be overwhelming, particularly for those with dementia. As a caregiver, you have more to think about than just yourself. Taking time to plan ahead can ease the stress and help make things a lot smoother and easier. Read More

How You Can Help an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

caregiver-stress-300x198Many Alzheimer’s caregivers are deeply dedicated and feel like they can handle anything. Usually they are often so burned out they can’t even imagine how anyone could assist them. In addition, they may be reluctant to ask for help because they don’t want to impose and because they’re afraid people will refuse to help.  Reaching out will help avoid getting burned out. We have put together some information on how to get the assistance the caregiver needs. Read More

Parkinson’s Disease and the Caregiver

in-home-parkinsons-ailment-care

What is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive, neurological disease that mainly affects movement but can also affect cognition. Parkinson’s disease results from the destruction of nerve cells in the brain that produce the chemical dopamine.

Caregiving for People Living with Parkinson’s

Caring for a loved one with PD can be a challenging job, especially as the disease progresses.  Get prepared, take care of yourself, get help (don’t try to do it all yourself), work to maintain a good relationship with your loved one, and encourage the person with PD for whom you care, to stay active.  Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 2

in home careFamily Cooperation

If the person with Alzheimer’s is a member of your family, your immediate family is likely to be your primary source of support and relief. Siblings often trade off care duty and share financial obligations.

But there are tremendous emotional benefits to a united family, too. Decision making is much easier when families are in general agreement. You’ll also be less likely to feel guilty or isolated, second-guess yourself, or waste mental energy feeling resentful or unappreciated if you can all work toward consensus (or at least mutual respect). Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 1

caregiver-stressMost people simply dive in to the responsibility of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease and then take it one day at a time. That sounds like the best course of action right? Before you find yourself combating both his disease and your own emotional strain and battle fatigue, be sure you have these stress-busters on your side.  If you don’t cover yourself first then your no help to him. Read More

Alzheimer’s and Respite Care

Just as we require a day off weekly and several days of rest annually, primary caregivers should require respite.seniormanhappy

Caregivers, especially unpaid family members, often need an interval of relief more—but utilize it less. One factor is the emotions tied up in the act of caregiving. You may feel you are the only one who can truly provide adequate care—or that seeking respite shows either weakness or lack of care. You might also worry that you cannot afford assistance or that no one would help if you asked.
According to HelpGuide.org, “Those with strong support systems, creative respite arrangements, and regular time away not only fare better, they also find more satisfaction in their caretaking roles.” Read More