alzheimer's care

Tag Archive for eldercare

Caregiver Tips for the Holidays

caregiving for the holidaysThe holiday season is typically thought of as a time of merriment, festivities, and visiting with family and friends. For older adults, however, the holidays can present some very unique challenges. For example, crowded family gatherings might be overwhelming, particularly for those with dementia. As a caregiver, you have more to think about than just yourself. Taking time to plan ahead can ease the stress and help make things a lot smoother and easier. Read More

Parkinson’s Disease and the Caregiver

in-home-parkinsons-ailment-care

What is Parkinson’s Disease?

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a progressive, neurological disease that mainly affects movement but can also affect cognition. Parkinson’s disease results from the destruction of nerve cells in the brain that produce the chemical dopamine.

Caregiving for People Living with Parkinson’s

Caring for a loved one with PD can be a challenging job, especially as the disease progresses.  Get prepared, take care of yourself, get help (don’t try to do it all yourself), work to maintain a good relationship with your loved one, and encourage the person with PD for whom you care, to stay active.  Read More

Tips on Caring For an Elderly Person with Arthritis

Arthritis can be painful and difficult for the elderly to deal with so it’s good to know how to help those with arthritis when necessary. Knowing about the different types of arthritis can also be very helpful. It’s the best way to assist those with arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritisarthritic elderly hand opening a pill bottle

There are two different types of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis causes swelling of the joints as well as joint damage. It’s an autoimmune disorder that can best be treated with medication. Osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage between the joints disintegrates. This causes the bones to rub against each other. Both types of arthritis can cause the joints to become inflamed and stiff which makes it hard for those with arthritis to move their joints. Arthritis most commonly occurs in the joints of the hands, wrists, knees and feet which can make it hard for those with arthritis to move around or pick things up. Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 2

in home careFamily Cooperation

If the person with Alzheimer’s is a member of your family, your immediate family is likely to be your primary source of support and relief. Siblings often trade off care duty and share financial obligations.

But there are tremendous emotional benefits to a united family, too. Decision making is much easier when families are in general agreement. You’ll also be less likely to feel guilty or isolated, second-guess yourself, or waste mental energy feeling resentful or unappreciated if you can all work toward consensus (or at least mutual respect). Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 1

caregiver-stressMost people simply dive in to the responsibility of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease and then take it one day at a time. That sounds like the best course of action right? Before you find yourself combating both his disease and your own emotional strain and battle fatigue, be sure you have these stress-busters on your side.  If you don’t cover yourself first then your no help to him. Read More

Dementia & Alzheimer’s Care

Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead

 

Alzheimer and Dementia CareAlzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one.

When planning for care of a loved one who suffers from dementia or Alzheimer’s consider these: Read More

Mood changes — a warning sign that care may be needed series

Dramatic mood changes can be a sign of mental decline. Sometimes depression can mask as dementia.  Swinging from anger to tears is a possible sign of early Alzheimer’s. Other things to watch for are forgetfulness and withdrawal from friends. Loneliness can also be a factor in elder mood changes. If that is the reason, find activities to help ease the loneliness.

See other warning signs that care may be needed. Download our printable checklist to see if care might be needed. Read More

Seniors and Pets

Dog and Cat Reclining on a Blanket I recently read an article about a woman with Alzheimer’s who wandered off and fell into a ravine. She was not found until the next day. This story had a happy ending due to the fact that the woman’s Doberman stayed by her side and would not leave, even when the paramedics came.

Animals offer a great contribution to the health and overall well-being of seniors. Read More

When is it time to make decisions for your parents?

Watching someone who took care of you decline in health and ability can be a difficult process. During the period you first see signs of mental or physical degeneration you may be tempted to start making or suggesting arrangements for your loved one.

Before you even mention the need for care, assess their situation. Expressing your suspicion can lead to adamant denial or arguments and if your concern is unwarranted, it will hinder future conversation.

E-How has a list of warning signs that elderly parents may need care, here it is: Read More

Alzheimer’s and Respite Care

Just as we require a day off weekly and several days of rest annually, primary caregivers should require respite.seniormanhappy

Caregivers, especially unpaid family members, often need an interval of relief more—but utilize it less. One factor is the emotions tied up in the act of caregiving. You may feel you are the only one who can truly provide adequate care—or that seeking respite shows either weakness or lack of care. You might also worry that you cannot afford assistance or that no one would help if you asked.
According to HelpGuide.org, “Those with strong support systems, creative respite arrangements, and regular time away not only fare better, they also find more satisfaction in their caretaking roles.” Read More