alzheimer's care

Tag Archive for home health

The Benefits of Home Care

Man-getting-out-of-bed1-300x300Home care has become increasingly popular as an assisted living option, as more elderly people need assistance. Because of the latest medical breakthroughs, millions of adults are now finding themselves taking care of older relatives and parents. When do you decide to utilize home care versus doing it on your own? Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 3

95613396-300x208This is part three of a series that offers some helpful tips to avoid caregiver burnout when dealing with someone suffering with Alzheimer’s disease. Learning as much as possible about Alzheimer’s can help alleviate burnout and make life easier for you and the person afflicted with this disease. This part discusses realistic expectations and setting up a game plan.  This is the final part of that series. Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 2

in home careFamily Cooperation

If the person with Alzheimer’s is a member of your family, your immediate family is likely to be your primary source of support and relief. Siblings often trade off care duty and share financial obligations.

But there are tremendous emotional benefits to a united family, too. Decision making is much easier when families are in general agreement. You’ll also be less likely to feel guilty or isolated, second-guess yourself, or waste mental energy feeling resentful or unappreciated if you can all work toward consensus (or at least mutual respect). Read More

Avoid Caregiver Burnout – Part 1

caregiver-stressMost people simply dive in to the responsibility of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease and then take it one day at a time. That sounds like the best course of action right? Before you find yourself combating both his disease and your own emotional strain and battle fatigue, be sure you have these stress-busters on your side.  If you don’t cover yourself first then your no help to him. Read More

Home Care Helps Seniors with Arthritis Lead an Active Life

Selective-focus image of Arthritic/Senior Adult Hands opening a pill bottleWhen a senior has painful arthritis, family members often worry that their loved one is not safe living at home. They wonder, “is Mom taking her medications correctly, and following other treatment instructions? Is she getting as much exercise as the doctor recommends? Is she getting out less because of her reduced mobility?” Family may also be juggling job tasks and other family responsibilities, spending more and more time taking their loved one to doctor’s appointments and helping with the housework and personal care.

Home care services can help your loved one manage arthritis in several important ways: Read More

Plan a Snack

This post is not just for those with diabetes, however, more than 25% of adults age 65 years and older deal with diabetes.  Individuals with type 1 diabetes control their blood sugar with insulin, while many of those with type 2 are able to manage through diet and exercise alone.

Mixed Nuts

 

Even those who do not have diabetes benefit from regular eating to maintain alertness, energy and blood sugar levels.  If a senior ever loses their appetite for an unexplained reason, alert their physician. “It’s important to alert doctors to medical conditions that have prevented eating for a day or more (such as illness)…the elderly, even without diabetes, are most vulnerable to developing hypoglycemia and other imbalances.”Cases of type 2 has shown a recent increase in nursing homes from 16 to 23% as “more people live longer and grow heavier.” Read More

Personal grooming and housekeeping changes — a warning sign that care may be needed series

A messy house is not necessarily a cause for concern. First, take into consideration underlying reasons. Person Washing Hands with Soap in WashbasinIf the elder is recovering from illness or injury, they may not have the ability to keep up their normal routine due to pain. If it has been awhile since you’ve seen the elder—maybe they don’t keep their house the same as they did when you were younger. You need to assess if this is by choice or lack of ability. Drastic changes, especially, are the concern. For both of those issues housekeeping services will help. If the holidays are near there can be other factors such as depression of the loss of loved ones or the family’s inability to come together. Still, you can be sensitive to recognize warning signs during occasional visits. See other warning signs that care may be needed. Download our printable checklist to see if care might be needed.

Guest Post–Lifestyle Home Medical Supply

One person needs durable medical equipment–another has an unused item gathering dust in a garage. LHMSlogoFilling the need, bridging the gap…

Many people, due to illness, accident or the aging process, find themselves in need of hospital beds, lift chairs, scooters or other durable medical equipment, but are without the means to purchase them. People in this situation face a greatly reduced quality of life and/or ability to rehabilitate. Other people face the situation of wondering what to do with good durable medical equipment (DME) that they no longer need. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a way to bridge the gap between these two common situations? There is a way, and Lifestyle Home Medical Supply provides Read More

Hoarding — a warning sign that care may be needed series

More than collecting, hoarding hampers everyday life by the excessive collection of unnecessary items. When hoarding becomes an issue, items which are not only unnecessary—but often unusable—are carefully guarded.

Many times, the hoarder is unaware how bad their situation has grown. Remember, it often takes time to amass the items.  They have become used to the living situation gradually.

Hoarding is linked to some of the other signs that care is needed, such as mobility, safety concerns and housekeeping changes. Read More

Preventing Falls in Older Adults

Prevent Falls in SeniorsIt is estimated that one in three adults age 65 and older fall each year. Older adults are hospitalized five times more frequently for falling related injuries than any other cause. Accidental falls are the leading cause of injury related deaths and non-fatal falls shown in one study estimated the average cost of falling to be $19,440 per person.

In addition to the injuries, many older adults develop a fear of falling and limit their activity. This actually decreases their mobility and increases their chance of falling. Read More