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Hacked By BALA SNIPER

Hacked By BALA SNIPER

Caring for Diabetic Foot Problems Begins with Prevention

Home Care

If you have type 2 diabetes, one of the biggest concerns you’re likely to face is diabetic foot ulcers.

As many as 70 percent of diabetics have mild to severe forms of nervous system damage which can cause impaired sensation or pain in their feet. Of all lower limb amputations in the U.S., nearly 70 percent are the result of diabetes – with four out of five of these amputations preceded by a foot ulcer.

Effective foot care management can make a big difference. This begins with routine foot care and evaluation, as it’s easier to fix something before the condition worsens.

Part of the problem is that diabetics, because of nerve system damage, don’t necessarily feel foot pain and so tend to ignore a problem until it’s too late. Since normal sweat secretion and oil production that lubricates the skin of the feet is often impaired, abnormal pressure on the skin, bones and joints of the feet during walking can lead to a breakdown of the skin and foot sores. Bacterial infection of the skin, connective tissues, muscles and bones may then occur. Since diabetics are prone to poor circulation, antibiotics cannot get to the infection site easily.

Prevention starts with inspecting your feet daily, seeing if there are cuts, cracks, redness, bruises, or swelling. Medical guidelines recommend that diabetics routinely see a foot specialist for an examination at least once a year. Experts can evaluate and get you the proper shoes to prevent breakdowns.

Recent studies have shown that a proper foot care program can reduce amputations by as much as 85 percent. This includes the use of therapeutic footwear.

Here are some other recommendations:
  • Wash your feet daily in lukewarm water and dry them gently.
  • Carefully trim your toenails regularly (and follow-up with a foot specialist).
  • Keep the skin on your feet soft and smooth.
  • Don’t go barefoot (even around the house).
  • Wear clean, dry socks – made from such fabrics as cotton and acrylic fibers (that pull sweat away from the skin); avoid nylon socks or those with tight elastic bands.
  • Buy shoes that fit properly (and speak to a foot doctor about special shoes that fit the exact shape of your feet, cushion them and evenly distribute your weight).
  • If you smoke, stop – smoking impairs circulation and reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood.
  • Take any foot injuries or changes to the skin very seriously.
  • Maintain a healthy diet, exercise regularly, and carefully monitor your blood sugar.
Although the treatment for diabetic foot problems has greatly improved in recent years, it all starts with prevention. And, should a foot problem occur, get prompt medical care.

Caring For a Senior With Seizures

Seizure in BrainEpilepsy is a common, chronic disorder caused by surges or disturbances in the electrical functioning of the brain. These surges or disturbances cause seizures, and during these seizures certain actions, movements, thoughts, speech, and emotions can be altered.

Caring for a senior with seizures is not too difficult.  Below is a list of do’s and don’ts to help make caregiving easier and a lot less stressful. Read More

Prevention: Key To Keeping Elderly Healthy

elderly-exerciseThe elderly population in the United States is increasing rapidly. By 2030, the number of those 65 or older will more than double to approximately 71 million.

This number of elderly Americans has far-reaching implications for our nation’s public health system and will place unprecedented demands on the provision of health care and aging-related services. Public health efforts to promote health and functional independence are critical strategies in helping older adults stay healthy. Read More

Tips To Convincing Your Aging Parents It’s Time To Stop Driving

1-Dangerous-Driver-300dpi-300x2003Driving is perhaps the ultimate symbol of independence and control.  An elderly person is likely going to feel trapped if they are required to give up driving when they are accustomed to that freedom.  Loss of control is a fear for anyone, especially for aging parents, who may be also feeling loss of control of their physical health.

From studies on the subject, we know that most people will relinquish the keys when asked to do so and when the time comes.  But there are still a sizable number of seniors who adamantly refuse to even consider it, in spite of accidents, and urgings of family. Read More

Guest Post–Lifestyle Home Medical Supply

One person needs durable medical equipment–another has an unused item gathering dust in a garage. LHMSlogoFilling the need, bridging the gap…

Many people, due to illness, accident or the aging process, find themselves in need of hospital beds, lift chairs, scooters or other durable medical equipment, but are without the means to purchase them. People in this situation face a greatly reduced quality of life and/or ability to rehabilitate. Other people face the situation of wondering what to do with good durable medical equipment (DME) that they no longer need. Wouldn’t it be great if there was a way to bridge the gap between these two common situations? There is a way, and Lifestyle Home Medical Supply provides Read More

Loss of Mobility — a warning sign that care may be needed series

Lack of mobility seriously hampers daily life for elders. If you or a loved one are prone to falling, view our resources for suggestions to keep the house free of clutter and increase exercise for strength and mobility.

RetirementIf an elder is rebuilding energy and strength after surgery or illness, consider having family members and friends take turns pitching in an occasional day to clean and cook. Keeping a few prepared meals easily accessible will ease the burden on the elder. If this is not possible respite care or housekeeping services will provide that help. Read More

Sensitive Solutions to Help with Hoarding

Compulsive hoarding (or pathological hoarding or disposophobia) is the excessive acquisition of possessions (and failure to use or discard them), even if the items are worthless, hazardous, or unsanitary. Compulsive
hoarding impairs mobility and interferes with basic activities, including cooking, cleaning, showering, and sleeping.

It can also put a senior at risk for one of the most life-threatening and preventable possibilities: falling. Read More

Early Warning Signs: A Senior May Need Help


I have been in the home care business long enough now to see the dangers that are so common to seniors. I would like to share with you some things to look for in your loved one’s life, and more importantly, how you can help.

In many peoples’ lives there comes a time when they can no longer maintain a healthy and safe lifestyle without the assistance of outside help. And more often than not, the real issue is about the loss of independence. For seniors, believing they might lose control over some of their independence if they accept outside help is a scary proposition. This is when a loved one needs to intervene with tact and help steer the senior toward a path of accepting help that can not only provide safety, but foster independence at home as well. Read More